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Battery Capacity vs. Discharge Rate

There are fundamental electrical principles, many based on Ohms law, that are constantly presenting themselves in various situations. The fact that Watts is equivalent to Volt x Current is always at the forefront of most design considerations. When it comes to battery capacity the amount of current being pulled from the bank has an important consequence to the overall capacity.

Engine Switches and Senders

Most boat operators are familiar with their gauge set and are aware that there is a device on the engine providing a signal to the gauge that allows it to provide useful information. However, many boaters are unfamiliar with the nature of those engine mounted devices.

Switch Terminology

In order to understand switches, it is necessary to understand the terminology associated with switches.First, a switch is a device that controls the flow of electricity by either stopping the flow (the switch is “off” or more correctly it is “open”), or by diverting the flow as with a changeover switch.

Connecting and Disconnecting from Shore Power

There is a suggested sequence for connecting and disconnecting from shore power and sound reasoning for it. When connecting to shore power, first make sure the main AC disconnect switch is in the “off” position and connect to the boat side inlet before connecting to the...

AC Reverse Polarity Indicator

An important part of a boat’s AC shore power system is the reverse polarity indicator light. Typically, power to a 120VAC system is delivered on three lines. A reverse polarity situation arises when the hot and neutral lines are inadvertently crossed making the neutral “hot”.

Double Pole AC Circuit Breaker

Most boats have a shore power inlet to plug into dockside power. The power supplied is AC (alternating current), and it is usually available in 240V/120V, with a 30A, 50A or 100A service offered. Most mid-sized boats (32 to 45 foot) will have a 30A inlet installed, as original equipment...

Vexilar Portable Depth Sounder/Fishfinder with built-in WiFi

This is a very cool idea. It looks like a tennis ball but it is a portable WiFi fish finder. The Vexilar SonarPhone T-Pod Sonar/Transducer can be cast, thrown from shore or pulled behind your boat. The SP100 has a single beam, 30 degree wide-angle beam signal using a 125 kHz transmit frequency. It has a self-contained battery that turns off automatically to save power, is charged through a computer USB port or the included USB wall plug charging cube and lasts up to 4 hours on a single charge.

Furuno 1st Watch Wireless Radar DRS4W

The Furuno DRS4W is the first wireless radar that can connect to your iPhone or iPad from up to 10 meters away. The radar is very similar to the Furuno 4KW dome radar, with a 36 mile range but the DRS4W has a built-in WiFi module. You still have to run a power cord but no thick radar cable.

Garmin Acquires Fusion Electronics

In our previous two Marine Electronics roundups we have been discussing the importance of integrating technology and platforms for marine products. These partnerships help further accelerate advancements in technology by improving connectivity, creation of turnkey devices, and even lower prices. In recent news, Garmin completed their acquisition of Fusion Electronics, a supplier of marine and car audio electronics, and has been rebranded as Fusion Entertainment.

Boater’s Test – Cell Phone Booster

Quite often we boat up at the end of Indian Arm, behind Croker Island and across from Granite Falls. The cell reception is spotty at best and it really depends on where you are standing on the dock or where you are in your dinghy out in the bay. There are a number of cellular to WiFi modem solutions, such as the Rogers Rocket Hub or the Telus Smart Hub, but I didn’t want to sign up to a monthly service. I also didn’t want to spend a lot on the initial hardware purchase or have something hard-wired to the boat.

Page 1 of 16    Total Results: 153